God's name

Stc95

Tribe of Judah Guild Wars Chapter Leader
So we all know that we shant use our Lord God's name in vain.
But what about those popular phrases "Oh my God!" "Thank God!" and others. I have been confused about this for a while. I dont think its wrong to say "Thank God" but somehow it leaves a sour taste in my mouth.

Just wondering all of your opinions. and its not limited to just SoE members. i just didnt feel like posting it in the CGA area.. :D
 

mist_01

New Member
It depends how you use it. If you say "thank God" and you mean "Thank you my God and Savior" thats great, however if you mean "what a relief" then it is using God's name in vain. At least, that is my take on it.
 

The Mighty Gerbil

Tribe of Judah TF 2 Chapter Leader & CGA Admin
Staff member
Sqweak-en

As there is a logical point to all of God's commandments using God's name in any insincere manner dilutes the power and respect it has (or should have). Saying "thank God" has become a popular meaningless phrase often said by people who don't believe in him. It probably gave birth to the more explicit "thank you Jesus" by people who properly wanted to be perceived as sincere in their faith. Of course that phrase to can be used in vain as well. Jewish people go as far as not spelling God fully in an attempt to keep his name holy. There is nothing wrong with the phrase "thank God" as long you are sincere about it, however, you may want to find a different phrase so you may be perceived as being sincere in order to point people towards him.

Consider also how many people use D@@@ in vain as well (although I use it properly I've omitted it with respect to the forums). Does stubbing you toe on something really worth condemning it to hell? To be "D'ed" is the absolute worse thing that can happen to you yet in our society it is not even perceived as the worst insult as this word is commonly allowed (on TV etc.), while other words are considered more harsh. This is a product of using something in vain.
 

ChickenSoup

Banned
When I say "thank God" it's when I'm thanking God that something did or didn't happen, in relief. I don't see how it's taking it "in vain", but I can somewhat understand if it became meaningless it would just be vanity to say it, or whatever.
 
I use "sheesh!" (you can't have missed me saying that) and "man!" as oppesed to "gosh" or "holy ________" (what ever you want to put there, inluding things like cows). When i say God i mean the God, the only God. I use it in respect, because that is what God deserves (the least and simplest thing). And when i say "holy" i mean it as in "Our God is holy". These are some words we should reserve for God alone. These things should NOT be used in expressions. Expressions are not something to start using, because it will spread like wildfire (trust me there...before you know it it will become things far greater than "thank God").
 

Stc95

Tribe of Judah Guild Wars Chapter Leader
Ok, thats all basically what i thought about "thank God" i mainly made the thread for "Oh my God" phrase and i just through in "thank God" just to clarify. I know that SoE doesnt allow "OMG" to be said on chat, and i went along with it only vaguely knowing why or why not. But i am curious (so kill the cat) and would like to know really why people should/shouldnt say it.
 

ppar3566

New Member
Yep I think it is a really good question. I would like the answer as well. I thought yep "Oh my God" was wrong but alot of my Indian friends who are devoted christians use the term all the time. Does that mean there is a cultural thing invovled? Im not sure
 

mist_01

New Member
I think that using God's name frivolously is taking it in vain and wrong, to put it succinctly. :)
 

Stc95

Tribe of Judah Guild Wars Chapter Leader
Mist.. you are using big words that are hard for me to pronounce...

but i think i got what you said..
I think right now im going on: If it doesnt have anything to with God or doesnt bring glory to God, dont say his name. So saying omg when someone tells you that they got a new pair of shoes wouldnt be good. But what about durning worship. I know that at least on of my songs that i listen to say "Oh my God, how can this be?"

would that be using it frivolsoudsy? (see Mist's word above)
 

The Mighty Gerbil

Tribe of Judah TF 2 Chapter Leader & CGA Admin
Staff member
But what about during worship. I know that at least on one of my songs that I listen to says "Oh my God, how can this be?" would that be using it frivolously?
I would think that context of being a worship song and the addition of "how can this be?" removes doubt as to the user's intent, but, I would have to hear the whole song to be certain. Sincere worship of God is never frivolous.

The phrase "Oh my God" is abused so much it has been noticed in other non-American cultures and has been used to comic effect (example: the manga series "Oh My Goddess" whose title is a take off on it). The phrase's popular misuse probably creates a picture to some foreigners that there are no earnest Christians in American. To reverse it I've wondered before what the Japanese truly believe in. They are supposed to be predominately Shinto-Buddhist and clearly lots of their media have Taoist themes, however, their seems to be nothing that they will not take liberties with. Shinto-Buddhism, Taoism, Catholicism, and anything you can name get mixed and their core doctrines are rewritten to suit plot devices. If you really believe something is truly important and sacred you don't take and present it in a way that is untrue and belittling.

Copied from Dictionary.com said:
Vain
–adjective, -er, -est.
1. excessively proud of or concerned about one's own appearance, qualities, achievements, etc.; conceited: a vain dandy.
2. proceeding from or showing personal vanity: vain remarks.
3. ineffectual or unsuccessful; futile: a vain effort.
4. without real significance, value, or importance; baseless or worthless: vain pageantry; vain display.
5. Archaic. senseless or foolish.
—Idiom
6. in vain,
a. without effect or avail; to no purpose: to apologize in vain.
b. in an improper or irreverent manner: to take God's name in vain.
 

mist_01

New Member
Mist.. you are using big words that are hard for me to pronounce...

but i think i got what you said..
I think right now im going on: If it doesnt have anything to with God or doesnt bring glory to God, dont say his name. So saying omg when someone tells you that they got a new pair of shoes wouldnt be good. But what about durning worship. I know that at least on of my songs that i listen to say "Oh my God, how can this be?"

would that be using it frivolsoudsy? (see Mist's word above)
In a worship song I am pretty sure that it is using it to God's Glory.
 

David's Sling

New Member
I think we should revere God's name, and use it carefully. When speaking directly to Him, or about Him (worship, prayer, evangelism, etc.) it is perfectly fine. However, I do not think His name should be use as a expression, possitive or negative. You can verbally thank God for something, but do not merely say "thank God" as an expression of satisfaction.

However, the Commandment: "Thou shalt not take the Lord's name in vain." refers to much more than using God's name irreverantly. The most important part of this commantment, in my opinion, and the part that most people overlook, is the sense of powerlessness. There are two meanings of the idiom "in vain". One refers to irreverence or inappropriateness, but the other means "without effect pr avail" (in a previous pos,t only the first(well, second one listed in said post) is bolded. The othe, I think, is equally important. We need to not only revere the name of our Lord, but also remember its power. We must hold to the knowledge that our God can accomplish anything that is His will, and that to call on His name will always yeild powerful results, though not often in the way we expect. It is sad though, to see the abuse of many expressions refering to our Lord. "Oh my God" should be an address to Him, and as such it is totally appropriate, but it has been so abused that even using it in proper context, it seems, is inappropriate in modern Christian culture.
 
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